Online Vision Tests: The Stuff Boomers Will Really Want To Know

online vision tests

You may have heard about online vision tests people can take to renew prescriptions for eyeglasses and contact lenses. This type of online vision test is a fantastic possibility for many people. But here's some time-saving information for baby boomers – it's not for you. That's because fifty-five is the upper age limit. But there's a vision test you can take from the comfort of home, and you should know about it.

A Vision Test Baby Boomers Should Know About

Everyone is familiar with the Snellen Eye Chart. We've all used this chart, or a variation of it, at our eye doctor's office. There's one large letter on top and lines of letters below it; each line is smaller in print than the one above. Eye doctors use the Snellen Chart and similar charts to measure our vision (e.g., 20/20, 20/200).

Three variations of the Snellen Chart:

  1. Tumbling E Chart
  2. Sloan Letters Chart
  3. Landolt C Chart

Taking the Snellen Eye Test at home can help you gauge the clarity of your distance vision. Using the Snellen Eye Chart can show you if you can pass the vision test for your driver's license.

This vision acuity test is available:

  • To take on your computer.
  • To take by using an app on your smart device.
  • To print from a website.

Taking the Vision Test on Your Computer

To take the Snellen Eye Test on your computer, find a website that offers the test. You'll need to do your research and choose the chart you think is best. Be aware that the differences between computer screens can be a problem with online Snellen Charts. Differences in the size and resolution of computer screens can affect the reliability of the test.

Two Online Eye Charts:

  1. SimpleVisionTest.com not only offers a Snellen-based eye chart, but it also has links to the vision requirements of the Department of Motor Vehicles (DMV) for every U.S. state, plus the District of Columbia.
  2. Eyes-and-Vision.com supplies a Snellen Chart with detailed measuring instructions to help you get the most exact results.

Eye Charts for Smart Devices

Eye chart apps are available for smart devices. Read the information provided by the app developers when choosing and using an app. Look for an app that offers a randomizable eye chart – to prevent the memorization of the letters. Find an eye chart app that can adapt the vision test chart to different user distances, screen sizes, and resolutions.

Three things to know about eye chart apps:

  1. Eye chart apps can supply a convenient rough vision screening when a chart is not available.
  2. Eye chart apps shouldn't be your primary visual acuity measuring tool.
  3. If you use an eye chart app, use it to complement a Snellen or Snellen-based wall or online chart.

Printable Eye Charts

You can find a printable Snellen Eye Chart or a similar eye chart online, like the Tumbling E Chart. The Hudson Valley Eye Surgeons' website offers a free Snellen Eye Chart printable with easy-to-follow instructions.

What To Know About Using an Eye Chart

  • Eye charts measure only visual acuity -- one of many components of good vision.
  • An eye chart doesn't give you a medical diagnosis or detect serious eye problems.
  • Eye charts can't show you if your eyes are focusing right or working together correctly.
  • A comprehensive eye exam performed by a licensed optometrist or ophthalmologist is the only way to figure out your eyes' health and if you see as clearly and comfortably as possible.

It's essential to see your eye care professional regularly. See your eye doctor whenever you have concerns about your vision or the health of your eyes.

The information and other content provided in this post, or any linked materials, are not intended and should not be construed as medical or health advice, nor is the information a substitute for professional medical expertise or treatment. If you or any other person have a medical or health concern, you should consult with your health care provider or seek other professional medical treatment. Never disregard professional medical or health advice or delay seeking it because of anything in this blog or any linked materials. If you think you may have a medical emergency, call your doctor or emergency services immediately. Any opinions and views expressed in this article have no relation to any academic, hospital, health practice, or other institution.